Application Spotlight: Semiconductor

Semiconductor manufacturing facilities employ a number of hazardous gases in their production processes.

Pollution Control in Real Life

For the past couple weeks we shined the spotlight on the Pollution Control Industry; we've looked at the threee ways to reduce emissions (Oxidizers, Incineration & Solvent Recovery). This week let's discuss HOW, by looking at real life applications:

Pollution Control: Solvent Recovery

Solvent recovery systems recover and re-use solvents from manufacturing processes. Solvent laden air from the processes is passed through an activated carbon bed. When the carbon bed is nearly saturated with solvent, a steam-down cycle occurs to condense out the solvent for re-use. The carbon is then regenerated for another collection phase. Two carbon beds are used so that one bed can process the solvent-laden air while the other one is regenerating.

Pollution Control: Incineration/Flare Stacks

It is becoming increasingly important to reduce emissions while saving energy when using a pollution control device such as a flare stack. Proper flare stack design is essential to handle their multiple waste streams for maximum performance with minimum emissions. Since destruction efficiency and emissions (both visible and invisible) are some of the most important criteria to consider when designing a flare, when the design is done correctly, dramatic money savings will also be realized.

Pollution Control: Incineration/Oxidizers

A flame ionization detector at the outlet of the oxidizer ensures that it does not exceed emission levels. In addition, by using two flame ionization detectors, one on the inlet and one on the outlet, hydrocarbons can be measured and compared before and after processing, indicating efficiency.

Application Spotlight: Pollution Control

Air pollution control devices are a series of devices that work to prevent a variety of different pollutants, both gaseous and solid, from entering the atmosphere primarily out of industrial smokestacks. These control devices can be separated into two broad categories - devices that control the amount of particulate matter escaping into the environment and devices that control acidic gas emissions.

Types of Monitoring in Oil & Gas

Since the oil & gas industry encompasses many different operations across its three major components (upstream, midstream and downstream), it requires various hazardous gas monitoring systems to protect personnel, product and facilities from accidental releases or leakage. 

Here are some examples of the types of monitoring necessary in the applications found in those components:

Application Spotlight: Oil & Gas Industry

The oil & gas industry is composed of three major components:

  1. upstream
  2. midstream
  3. downstream

The upstream industry finds and produces crude oil and natural gas. The midstream industry processes, stores, markets and transports commodities such as crude oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids. The downstream industry includes the oil refineries, petrochemical plants, petroleum product distributors and natural gas distribution companies.

Solvent Based Printing in Real Life

For the past couple weeks we shined the spotlight on the Solvent Based Printing application; WHAT goes on and WHICH hazards they face. This week let's discuss HOW you can save on costs through monitoring, by looking at real life applications:

Solvent Based Printing 101 Case History

Key Hazards in Solvent Based Printing

Solvent-based inks are essential for usage on packages of many types due to its usage on an extensive variety of exteriors and its properties of resistance to weather.These industries employ ovens or dryers to remove the solvents from the finished product.
 

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